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Power Cable Detector PCD

W

hen cutting and coring, early warning of the presence of electrical cables in concrete reduces the risk of costly damages and injury. Conquest combines power cable detection (PCD) with traditional GPR responses to provide a new dimension to concrete imaging: two technologies more.

PCD measures the magnetic fields created by current flow in electrical wiring. When wiring is embedded in or beneath concrete, PCD enhances the user's ability to distinguish electrical cables from other structures.

This sheet shows examples of PCD responses, correlated with the GPR depth slices. By looking at both results, users can greatly reduce the number of incidents when cutting and coring. PCD is standard on all Conquest systems.

PCD measures the magnetic fields created by current flow in electrical wiring. When wiring is embedded in or beneath concrete, PCD enhances the user’s ability to distinguish electrical cables from other structures.

GPR image: 7-8” Depth Slice
GPR image: 7-8” Depth Slice

Conduit beneath rebar – suspended slab
Conduit beneath rebar – suspended slab

Power Cable Responses Examples

Conduits beneath slab - surface mounted
Conduits beneath slab - surface mounted:Reinforced concrete slab above an electrical room. On the underside are four surface mounted conduits, curving through the image. Although the PCD images shows an “amalgamated” response, the GPR image can discern 4 targets.

Conduit above rebar - suspended slab
Conduit above rebar – suspended slab

Conduits in slab with metal deck beneath. It can be very hard to detect objects in the "troughs" of a metal deck with GPR. The PCD highlights any conduits carrying power.
Conduits in slab with metal deck beneath: It can be very hard to detect objects in the "troughs" of a metal deck with GPR. The PCD highlights any conduits carrying power.

Download the case study: Power Cable Detector PCD

Learn more about Conquest GPR

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