Best Practices
close X
Nav Menu
 

Best Practices

Best Practices for Measuring Winter Roads Ice Thickness Using GPR

When winter roads and ice bridges across rivers and lakes are used to transport people and goods, safety is critical; the thinnest ice measured must be thick enough at each crossing to support the total combined weight of vehicles and their heavy loads. Frequent monitoring is important to ensure the ice does not deteriorate by melting or below surface currents, reducing the maximum weight rating for that section of the winter road. As ice thickens in the winter, frequent monitoring also allows the load weight limits to increase, improving transportation efficiency. Most northern jurisdictions use formulas like the Gold’s formula that relate the ice thickness to the maximum gross vehicle weight allowed on the road. Ice thickness can be monitored by drilling ice cores at regular intervals and assuming the ice is no thinner than the minimum core value measured. This assumption is often a poor one as ice thicknesses between cores may thin dramatically for various reasons. A much more accurate method to determine true ice thickness is to supplement ice cores with current technologies such as a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) system to provide a continuous measurement of ice thickness over the entire length of the ice road.
Download the PDF

Field Guide for Archaeologists Using GPR

This guide is written to assist archaeologists using GPR, or to serve as a short refresher if you haven’t used the equipment in a while. It assumes you’ve used the GPR before and are familiar with its basic functionality.
Download the PDF

Guidebook for Scanning Concrete with GPR

This guidebook provides details on applications for concrete scanning, GPR best practices, case studies.
Download the PDF