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Rescue Radar Brochure

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Case Studies

Operator deploying GPR at a damaged building site to locate people

Buried victim search & rescue

When disaster strikes and people are buried alive, search and rescue teams need to be readily deployed with simple-to-use search techniques. Teams commonly employ audible detection of victims’ cries for help, trained sniffer dogs and even cell phones. More recently, remote sensing technologies are starting to emerge. This case study examines the use of customized GPR technology to locate buried victims in an experimental facility

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Rescue Radar

Overview

FIND BURIED SURVIVORS IN MINUTES 

Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Rescue Radar from Sensors & Software

When disaster strikes, the first hours are critical to save the lives of buried victims.

Immediately following a disaster, emergency personnel rush to the scene to rescue survivors from the rubble. Search and Rescue teams must quickly assess the situation and decide where to focus their resources. These initial decisions dictate the success of the rescue effort.

Rescue Radar is designed for rapid deployment by Search & Rescue teams to quickly find survivors trapped beneath the surface. Rescue Radar uses ground penetrating radar (GPR) signals to detect the movement of a victim below the surface – body movements – even movements associated with breathing.

Locate unconscious and conscious victims Effective in high noise and high wind environments Increase certainty – complements the use of canine and seismic rescue systems Minimal training required Multi-language, intuitive graphical user interface.

Operator deploying GPR at a damaged building site to locate people

Operator deploying GPR at a damaged building site to locate people who may be buried alive!

  • Locate unconscious and conscious victims
  • Effective in high noise and high wind environments
  • Increase certainty – complements the use of canine and seismic rescue systems
  • Minimal training required
  • Multi-language, intuitive graphical user interface

RESCUE MODES

Rescue Radar has two different modes that can be toggled with a single press of a button

Basic Mode: locate trapped victims

 

 

 

 

Basic Mode Allows first responders with minimal or no training to locate trapped victims. The interface shows a life status symbol on a scale to indicate the distance from Rescue Radar to the victim.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advanced Mode: locate movement and monitor over a period of time

 

 

Advanced Mode Allows operators to locate movement and monitor over a period of time to reduce false alarms. The depth scale is shown on the left side of the screen and the number of cycles on the top Consistent life status symbols over a number of cycles build confidence for first responders that a victim is still alive; either conscious and moving or unconscious and breathing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Locate victims Save lives

OPERATION

1 Arriving at the scene, operators open the Rescue Radar case and remove the tablet computer.

2 The Rescue Radar system is placed in the disaster zone and the operator stands back and starts the system.

3 Rescue Radar continuously sends GPR signals into the subsurface to detect movement. In seconds, the tablet computer displays the distance from the system to a potential victim under the rubble.

Find survivors trapped beneath the surface

FEATURES

  • Designed for the harshest environments: tough, weatherproof, Pelican case
  • Rugged tablet: meets military specifications for the toughest rescue conditions
  • Extended battery life
  • Always stay connected: 75m of Wi-Fi connection radius with tablet
  • Adjustable depth display: adapt to site conditions
  • One package: the system operates in transport case with no additional setup
  • Always ready: low maintenance

Applications

Urban Search and Rescue team use Rescue Radar to find living victims in collapsed buildings due to:

  • Earthquake
  • Flood
  • Acts of war
  • Tsunami
  • Mining disaster
  • Structural degredation
  • Tornado
  • Rock slide
  • Structural aging
  • Hurricane
  • Mud slide
  • Structural design flaws
  • Fire
  • Terrorist attack

 
 
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